Sarah Hyland Fights Back Against Body Shamers

Modern Family’s Sarah Hyland is one tough cookie. This week, she took to Twitter to fight back against some pretty nasty comments she’s been getting. Hyland, 26, has been very open about her medical history in the past: In 2012, she underwent a kidney transplant. Sarah suffered from a congenital kidney condition called kidney dysplasia. To prevent her body from rejecting the new kidney (received from her father), Hyland must take a number of anti-rejecting drugs, including Prednisone. These have caused changes in her physical appearance. In her message, Hyland wrote:

“I haven’t had the greatest year. Maybe one day I’ll talk about it but for now, I’d like my privacy. I will say that this year has brought a lot of changes and with that, physical changes.

“I have been told that I can’t work out. Which, for me, is very upsetting. I love to be STRONG. (I’ll be using that word a lot) Strength is everything. Being strong has gotten me where I am. Both mentally and physically. I am not a fan of ‘being skinny.’ ”

” ‘Eat a burger,’ ‘your head is bigger than your body and that’s disgusting.’ And you’re right! … No one’s head should be bigger than their body but considering I’ve basically been on bed rest for the past few months, I’ve lost a lot of muscle mass. My circumstances have put me in a place where I’m not in control of what my body looks like. So I strive to be as healthy as possible, as everyone should.”

“Oh and no that’s not photoshop. Those are my legs. Those are my arms. I write this because I’ve been accused of promoting anorexia in, ironically enough, an anti bullying post. And I want young girls to know that that’s NOT my intention.”

I am working hard to maintain my weight by eating as much protein as possible and continue to be STRONG and healthy.

“It’s never fun to look in the mirror and see your hard work at the gym fade away or have your legs be the size of one’s arms. But I know that when I get clearance I will be able to get back to the STRONG, lean, and fabulous self I know I can be.”

“I don’t mind when you say that I look pregnant. Or fat. Because I know that my face is swollen from my medication that is saving my life. For those on Prednisone I know what you’re going through and I commend you sticking it out as I have.”

“My self confidence is not rendered from your comments. Because I will always be too fat. I will always be too skinny. I will never have enough curves to be called a woman. And I will always be a slut for wearing a push up bra. Love the you you set out to be. Be the best version of yourself. Be healthy.”

Good for you Sarah!

Why do you need anti-rejections drugs after a transplant?

Your body’s immune system is designed to keep you healthy by sensing “foreign invaders,” such as bacteria, and rejecting them. But your immune system will also sense that your new kidney is foreign. To keep your body from rejecting it, you’ll have to take drugs that turn off, or suppress, your immune response. You may have to take two or more of these immunosuppressant medicines, as well as medications to treat other health problems.
There are usually 4 classes of anti-rejection drugs:

Side Effects of Immunosuppressants

Immunosuppressants can weaken your immune system, which can lead to infections. Some drugs may also change your appearance. Your face may get fuller; you may gain weight or develop acne or facial hair. Not all patients have these problems, though, and diet and makeup can help.

Immunosuppressants work by diminishing the ability of immune cells to function. In some patients, over long periods of time, this diminished immunity can increase the risk of developing cancer. Some immunosuppressants cause cataracts, diabetes, extra stomach acid, high blood pressure, and bone disease. When used over time, these drugs may also cause liver or kidney damage in a few patients.

Michele R. Berman, M.D. was Clinical Director of The Pediatric Center, a private practice on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. from 1988-2000, and was named Outstanding Washington Physician by Washingtonian Magazine in 1999. She was a medical internet pioneer having established one of the first medical practice websites in 1997. Dr. Berman also authored a monthly column for Washington Parent Magazine.

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