The Who Cancel Tour Due to Roger Daltrey Illness

The Who have been forced to cancel the remaining dates of their The Who Hits 50! tour because lead singer Roger Daltrey has been diagnosed with viral meningitis. The 71-yr-old had been fighting what was initially called a “mystery illness.”  The band later announced on their website:

” Initially it was hoped that the rest of the tour might proceed, but after extensive tests the seriousness of his condition became apparent when doctors diagnosed Roger as having viral Meningitis and prescribed a period of rest. “

Roger went on to say:

“We are very sorry to disappoint our fans in this way.  For the last four weeks, I have been in and out of the hospital and have been diagnosed with viral Meningitis. I am now on the mend and feeling a lot better but I am going to need a considerable time to recover.  The doctors tell me I will make a complete recovery, but that I should not do any touring this year.”

Roger was particularly disappointed to miss the Teen Cancer America benefit in Los Angeles, a “charity that he and The Who have worked tirelessly for. ”

What is viral meningitis?

Meningitis. Human brain and meningococcal bacteria. Meninges of the central nervous system: dura mater, arachnoid, and pia mater

Meningitis is an inflammation of the tissue that covers the brain and spinal cord. Viral meningitis is the most common type of meningitis. It is often less severe than bacterial meningitis, and most people usually get better on their own (without treatment). However, infants younger than 1 month old and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have severe illness.

Non-polio enteroviruses are the most common cause of viral meningitis in the United States, especially from summer to fall when these viruses spread most often. However, only a small number of people who get infected with enteroviruses will actually develop meningitis.

Other viruses that can cause meningitis are

  • Mumps virus
  • Herpesviruses, including , herpes simplex viruses, and varicella-zoster virus (which causes chickenpox and shingles)
  • Measles virus
  • Influenza virus
  • Arboviruses, such as West Nile virus
  • Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

What are the symptoms of viral meningitis?

Common symptoms in adults include:

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Stiff neck
  • Sensitivity to bright light
  • Sleepiness or trouble waking up from sleep
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Lack of appetite
  • Lethargy (a lack of energy)

Most people with viral meningitis usually get better on their own within 7 to 10 days.

Initial symptoms of viral meningitis are similar to those for bacterial meningitis. However, bacterial meningitis is usually severe and can cause serious complications, such as brain damage, hearing loss, or learning disabilities. It is very important to see a healthcare provider right away if you think you or your child might have meningitis; a doctor can determine if you have the disease, the type of meningitis, and the best treatment.

Meningitis can only be diagnosed by doing specific lab tests on specimens from the sick person. If meningitis is suspected, naso-oropharyngeal swabs, rectal swabs, stool, cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and serum are collected and sent to the laboratory for testing.

How is viral meningitis treated?

In most cases, there is no specific treatment for viral meningitis. Most people who get viral meningitis completely recover on their own within 7 to 10 days. However, people with meningitis caused by certain viruses such as herpesvirus and influenza, may benefit from treatment with an antiviral medication.

Antibiotics do not help viral infections, so they are not useful in the treatment of viral meningitis. However, antibiotics are very important when treating bacterial meningitis.

Source: CDC

Michele R. Berman, M.D. was Clinical Director of The Pediatric Center, a private practice on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. from 1988-2000, and was named Outstanding Washington Physician by Washingtonian Magazine in 1999. She was a medical internet pioneer having established one of the first medical practice websites in 1997. Dr. Berman also authored a monthly column for Washington Parent Magazine.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Real Time Analytics Google Analytics Alternative