The View Hosts Show Off Their Weight Loss

The new season of The View premiered yesterday with it’s new cast. Whoopee Goldberg was joined by returning host Rosie O’Donnell and newbies Rosie Perez and Nicolle Wallace.

Whoopee and Rosie O’Donnell were both sporting slimmer figures, Whoopee having lost 35 pounds, and Rosie about 53 pounds.

Rosie began the weight loss process after surviving a heart attack in August 2012. She opted to use weight loss surgery, specifically a vertical sleeve gastectomy, in 2013 to help her lose weight. She claims to have weighed 237 pounds before the procedure.  Rosie told People magazine that she’s still “not used to [the weight loss] yet. I still buy the wrong-sized clothes.” She went on to say:

“A lot of people who have never had weight issues their whole life would assume that losing weight and going from morbidly obese to being able to buy clothes off the rack would be only full of happiness and positivity, but that’s not true. It’s also full of anxiety and vulnerability. I’m glad it’s going at the rate it is because any faster than this would throw me into a panic.”

Whoopee Goldberg says she has been using the The Pound a Day Diet by Rocco DiSpirito. She’s content with her current weight loss. “If I think about [losing more weight], I would start freaking out. I’m just doing it.”

What is a Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy?

graphic_vertical_sleeve_gastrectomyVertical Sleeve Gastectomy (Gastric Sleeve)  restricts food intake and decreases the amount of food used. The new, smaller stomach is about the size of a banana. It limits the amount of food you can eat by making you feel full after eating small amounts of food.

Removing most of the stomach may decrease ghrelin, a hormone that prompts appetite. Lower amounts of ghrelin may reduce hunger more than other purely restrictive surgeries, such as Adjustable Gastric Band.

Sleeve gastectomy may be appropriate for patients who:

  • A body mass index (BMI) of 40 or more. Someone with a BMI of 40 or more is at least 100 pounds over their recommended weight. A normal BMI is between 18.5 and 25.
  • A BMI of 35 or more and a serious medical condition that might improve with weight loss. Some of these conditions are sleep apnea, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

After the procedure the patient must make radical changes in his food intake and lifestyle to maintain a successful outcome. Meals have to be small-less than half a cup- to prevent the stomach from stretching too much (defeating the purpose of making the stomach smaller in the first place). Drinking fluids with meals may decrease the amount of solid food you could consume at a meal.


Since this procedure does not re-route the passage of food, it is less likely to cause complications such as the malabsorption of vitamins.

What is The Pound a Day Diet?

pound-day-diet-700The Pound a Day Diet was released in January 2014 by celebrity chef Rocco DiSpirito. It claims that the plan can help users shed up to 5 lbs. in five days while eating their  favorite foods.

Frightened by a health scare of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, the six foot-one-inch chef underwent his own diet transformation by changing the kinds of food he ate and moderating the amount of food and alcohol he consumed. He was able to go from 226 pounds down to 185.

From this, DiSpirito devised his own two-phase weight-loss plan centered on the Mediterranean Diet in the hope of helping others lose weight.

Phase One is a 28-day plan where users are limited to 850 calories on weekdays and 1,200 calories on the weekends. Complete menus are supplied by DiSpirito for both weekday and weekend meals. Users must consume lots of water — half your weight in ounces every day — and six small protein-packed meals. One of the staples of the diet is a breakfast chocolate shake:

High-Protein Chocolate Breakfast Smoothie

Yield: Four 16-ounce servings


6 cups cold water

2 tablespoons psyllium husk powder

2 scoops fiber powder (such as ReNew Life Triple Fiber)

2 scoops protein powder (such as Daily Benefit)

1⁄4 cup plus 2 tablespoons dark unsweetened cocoa powder (such as Hershey’s Special Dark)

24 packets monk fruit extract (such as Monk Fruit In the Raw; optional)

4 scoops unflavored egg-white powder (such as Jay Robb)

2 cups crushed ice or small ice cubes


1. Put the water, psyllium husk powder, and fiber powder in a blender and blend on high until smooth and slightly thickened, about 1 1⁄2 minutes.

2. Turn the blender off and add the protein powder, cocoa, and monk fruit powder, if using; blend until smooth, about 30 seconds, and turn off the blender.

3. Add the egg-white powder and blend until smooth, about 10 seconds, then add the ice and blend until smooth, about 30 seconds.

4. Pour the smoothie into 4 pint-sized glasses.

Tip: Add a pinch of salt if your diet can afford the sodium—it will really draw out the full flavor of the cocoa.

Per serving: 198 calories, 2g fat (.25g sat), 0mg cholesterol, 488mg sodium, 15g carbohydrate, 8g fiber, 30.75g protein

Nutrient content claims: Reduced calorie / Low fat / Low saturated fat / Cholesterol free / No added sugar / High fiber / High protein / Gluten free / Trans fat free

DiSpirito claims that at the end of the four week period you will be at your goal weight (Really?? Even if you have a lot to lose???)

The goals of Phase Two are to:

  • Rebalance portion size
  • Eat less meat
  • Add more vegetables, fruits, and whole grains

Registered dietician Keri Gans is unhappy about The Pound a Day’s rapid weight loss claims. In an article in Shape, she points out that “Research shows that rapid weight loss (anything more than one to two pounds per week) may lead to gallstones, dehydration, malnutrition, and electrolyte imbalances. Other possible side effects include headaches, irritability, fatigue, dizziness, constipation, menstrual irregularities, hair loss, and muscle loss.” As she tells her clients:

“The winner in weight loss is not the person who loses it the fastest, but rather the person who keeps it off the longest.”


Michele R. Berman, M.D. was Clinical Director of The Pediatric Center, a private practice on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. from 1988-2000, and was named Outstanding Washington Physician by Washingtonian Magazine in 1999. She was a medical internet pioneer having established one of the first medical practice websites in 1997. Dr. Berman also authored a monthly column for Washington Parent Magazine.

1 Comment

  1. Addison Verger

    September 23, 2014 at 5:33 pm

    Visual culture is highly pervasive in the world of Hollywood. Whether you are a highly visible movie star or an “out of the spotlight” screenwriter, existing in a bubble where appearance is everything can have a large effect on where one places their values.
    The issue of weight is one of the most commonly addressed visible issues as it is seen as, largely, changeable; although one could argue that measures of plastic surgery could also allow other physical features to be seen as “changeable,” one’s weight is something that can fluctuate without medical intervention. In a world where patience is in short supply, the market for “the next quick weight loss solution” has seen a rise and the thought of moderate exercise and healthful eating habits, as a means of weight loss, is often viewed as ludicrous. Despite evidence that most, if not all, of these “quick weight loss solutions” are nearly impossible to maintain and often show quick results as a means of tricking the consumer, many people still believe these programs can offer them salvation.
    In the case of Rosie O’Donnell, who has long struggled with obesity and thus underwent a weight loss surgery as a means of preventing the further risk of a possible heart attack, this change can be seen as a relatively good visual representation. Although “smart weight loss” (healthful dieting and exercise) should always be pushed as the most practical and worth while solution to one’s weight issues, the portrayal of a high profile celebrity’s decision to undergo weight loss surgery to help further her life can offer someone in a similar situation the possibility of hope, in the case that he/she thinks they have no options left. However, in the case of Whoopee Goldberg, who once famously admitted that she would spend all of her weight watchers points on a single Big Mac a day, the decision to pursue a fad diet like “The Pound a Day Diet,” seems to be a poor visual representation of what true health values one should hold. It is widely known to anyone who has studied nutrition that rapid weight loss such as this can lead to health problems and other negative side effects.
    I find it vaguely ironic that the hosts of a show aimed at the modern day, middle aged, typical American woman, would be so concerned with their weight loss, or at least acknowledge, and thus, give value to, this change in their appearance. Despite possibly viewing themselves as “out of the spotlight” celebrities (Goldberg is also famously known for sporting Crocs on the show), these women have a large impact on the individuals who tune into their show every afternoon, and thus, value their opinions. Much in the way that celebrities who champion diseases or vaccinations can affect the general public (such as Elvis publicly receiving the polio vaccine), what a celebrity eats, drinks, or otherwise indirectly advertises, can impact how that product is consumed. Celebrities should make the more proactive decision to “market” healthy habits and products to the general public and a set a good example for those that look up to them.

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