Gavin DeGraw Suffers Concussion from Assault

Singer Gavin DeGraw had just left some friends after visiting some bars in the East Village when he was assaulted by a group on “unknown men.” If that wasn’t enough, while still dazed and confused, the “I Don’t Wanna Be” singer was hit by a taxi cab! He was taken to Bellevue Hospital where it is reported that he suffered from a broken nose, a cut on his face, and a concussion.

A spokesman for DeGraw told MTV:

“Gavin DeGraw is currently recovering and in stable condition at Bellevue Hospital where he was taken late Sunday night by ambulance after he was attacked by a group of assailants. He suffers from a concussion, broken nose, black eyes, cuts and bruises. The police are conducting an investigation of the attack.

Gavin and his family appreciate everyone’s concern at this time. We have no information yet regarding his upcoming concert dates and promotion for his new album.”

DeGraw had been opening for Maroon Five and Train on their tour, and has had to cancel his performance in Saratoga Springs, New York today.

A concussion is a traumatic brain injury (TBI) that may result in a bad headache, altered levels of alertness, or unconsciousness.

It temporarily interferes with the way your brain works, and it can affect memory, judgment, reflexes, speech, balance, coordination, and sleep patterns.

Every year, millions of people have a head injury. Most of these injuries are minor because the skull provides the brain with considerable protection. The symptoms of minor head injuries usually go away on their own. More than half a million head injuries a year, however, are severe enough to require hospitalization.

Symptoms of a concussion can range from mild to severe. They can include:

  • Altered level of consciousness (drowsy, hard to arouse, or similar changes)
  • Confusion, feeling spacey, or not thinking straight
  •  Headache
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Memory loss (amnesia) of events before the injury or immediately after
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Seeing flashing lights
  • Feeling like you have “lost time”

Healing or recovering from a concussion takes time. It may take days, weeks, or even months. You may be irritable, have trouble concentrating, be unable to remember things, have headaches, dizziness, and blurry vision. These problems will probably go away slowly. You may want to get help from family or friends before making important decisions.

 

Photo Credit: Bob Levey/AP Photo for VH1 Save The Music

Michele R. Berman, M.D. was Clinical Director of The Pediatric Center, a private practice on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. from 1988-2000, and was named Outstanding Washington Physician by Washingtonian Magazine in 1999. She was a medical internet pioneer having established one of the first medical practice websites in 1997. Dr. Berman also authored a monthly column for Washington Parent Magazine.

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